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Boston Univ School of Public Health  

Boston,  MA 
United States
https://www.bu.edu/sph/
  • Msg #4359: Booth: 225

Since 1976, Boston University’s School of Public Health (SPH) has been growing, innovating, discovering, and launching the careers of some of the most accomplished and influential public health practitioners. Ranked 8 in the U.S. News & World Report, BUSPH offers master’s- and doctoral-level degree programs as well as non credit bearing continue education courses. Our faculty are thought leaders in biostatistics, community health sciences, environmental health, epidemiology, global health, and health law, policy & management. BUSPH's growing research portfolio is one of the largest at BU, America’s fourth largest research university. Our innovative, skills-based curriculum, practicum, and extensive community-based service programs prepare students for careers in research, industry, government, and academia.

To learn more about our degree programs or connect with our program directors during APHA, please use Zoom links below:

Sunday, October 25: 12pm–1pm, Mountain Time

PhD in Health Services Research Information Session with Steve Pizer, PhD
Zoom Link: https://bostonu.zoom.us/j/97306635760?pwd=YzNTMlZyaXgwc0JJYUpGYU55bnZ4Zz09

Sunday, October 25: 2pm–4pm, Mountain Time

PhD in Epidemiology Information Session with Sherri Stuver, ScD
Zoom Link: https://bostonu.zoom.us/j/98605817820?pwd=b1ZMVjlwTUhiTWNnbmdYV2s3NTNnQT09

Monday, October 26: 12pm–1pm, Mountain Time

PhD in Environmental Health Information Session with Birgit Claus Henn, ScD
Zoom Link: https://bostonu.zoom.us/j/96322226217?pwd=eFNkT0U1L0RmcXpRWUJXSWw3RUE4QT09

Monday, October 26: 1pm–2pm, Mountain Time

DrPH Information Session with Trish Elliott, DrPH
Zoom Link: https://bostonu.zoom.us/j/97330551524?pwd=QUhNQ0VXMVNUVnY2T2MrMnhEek1ldz09


 Msg #4367: Press Releases

  • The School of Public Health will welcome cross-cutting expertise, diverse perspectives, and equity-oriented action to its community as it embarks on an ambitious faculty hiring search this summer and fall.

    The search, which launched this month, is the largest faculty recruitment effort in the school’s history. Unlike previous searches, which have filled departmental needs, this effort is school-wide with a goal to hire experts who will advance the five strategic research directions identified in SPH’s strategy map. The strategic research areas—cities and health; climate, the planet, and health; health inequities; infectious diseases; and mental and behavioral health—were selected based on school-wide input of where public health work is critically needed, and they also represent the school’s areas of strength and potential for growth.

    The search will be overseen by Michael McClean, associate dean for research and faculty advancement. The search committee will include the members of the Strategic Research Direction working group, as well as additional departmental representatives.

    “We are very fortunate to have outstanding faculty who are such dedicated educators, researchers, and practitioners,” says McClean. “After these five research directions emerged from our refresh of the strategy map, we wanted to put real resources towards moving these areas forward, and one of the most important things that we can do is make sure that we have sufficient faculty expertise in each of those areas.”

    McClean spoke more about the school’s vision for new faculty, how the school is emphasizing diversity and equity throughout the hiring process, and why SPH is an ideal place to research, teach, and learn about public health.

    Q&A WITH MICHAEL MCCLEAN

    Can you share more about the process and goals of this hiring search?

    Our goal is to find a robust cohort of candidates who will be outstanding researchers and teachers in one or more of the cross-cutting strategic research areas that are identified in the school’s strategy map. This is an open rank recruitment and each new faculty will ultimately be appointed to one of the school’s six departments, depending on their particular background and interests. But the key is that we will be building our capacity and expertise in the five content areas.

    There is also some potential to bring in candidates who may be working in an area that’s tangentially related to one of our five strategic directions, and who can apply their skills to advancing our collective work in that area. One of the many benefits of conducting this search at the school level is that we can make sure that the whole school community is aware of what we’re doing. When we bring in candidates to visit, we will advertise that broadly for people who would like to participate in the process.  

    For interested candidates, what distinguishes SPH from other public health institutions and makes it the ideal place to work?

    At SPH, we have a very supportive environment for faculty. To ensure that each faculty member is put in the best possible position to successful and productive, we provide a vibrant and comprehensive portfolio of faculty development resources. These include attractive start-up packages, a faculty mentoring program, a faculty incentive programannual discretionary funds, a pilot award program, a grant-writing workshop, and a sabbatical program, as well as wonderful faculty development programs at the campus level. We also have units of the school dedicated to facilitating collaborations with community and advocacy organizations via the Activist Lab, opportunities to engage with the private sector and other non-traditional partners via idea hub, and access to cutting-edge data analytics and research project support via the Biostatistics and Epidemiology Data Analytics Center.

    In addition to providing these resources, our general approach to managing faculty activities is also very flexible. People tend to like the things that they’re best at doing, so faculty have a lot of flexibility in deciding what their activities will be, based on what they are most passionate about. They aren’t pigeon-holed into doing a structured mix of activities. The mix of research, teaching, and other activities is not only different across faculty members, but can also change for faculty over time. This approach is really useful because it creates an efficient system where our entire faculty body can focus primarily on the things that they enjoy the most, typically resulting in the best outcomes for the faculty member and the school.

    Also, one great thing about Boston University is that it is rich with resources, and can be as big or as small as you need it to be. At one level, SPH is one of 17 schools and colleges at the university, and each department and program within the school can be a very nurturing place—like a small community that allows you to do what you want to do. And at a larger level, faculty can also expand beyond SPH and benefit from resources across the medical campus and the entire university, which is one of the largest in the country. If a faculty member at SPH is looking for someone with engineering expertise, BU has an entire school of engineers, and the same goes for the business school, the law school, the medical school, et cetera. We have a lot of expertise university-wide that naturally intersects with, and relates to, public health.

    What efforts are being taken to ensure this hiring process is diverse and inclusive?

    In recent years, we have made significant improvements to our faculty search process at SPH. While it is always important to follow best practices when hiring, it is especially important to meet our own expectations on diversity and inclusion. We have now developed an extensive guidebook for conducting faculty searches. Vanessa Edouard, our director of strategic initiatives, sits on every search committee as a representative of my office to make sure that we’re following best practices for conducting searches. Process really does matter if we want to achieve the best outcomes.

    In the three years prior to implementing these changes we hired 24 faculty, and 4 percent of those faculty recruits were Black or LatinX. In the three years since implementing our improvements, 42 percent of our next 24 faculty recruits were Black or LatinX, which is very encouraging. And while I do feel we are on the right track, we cannot get complacent. Continuing to prioritize diversity and inclusion is one of our priorities of this search, and we want to make sure that we hire a group that is diverse in all possible ways.

    How will students most benefit from this hiring search?

    These five research directions emerged from our school-wide effort to identify what we think are the most critical public health needs in the world, what are we good at, and where we see our potential for growth. These are the things our students are passionate about, too. Increasing our capacity in these areas will increase our expertise and mentoring and research opportunities, and will directly serve our students well.

    Some of our students, particularly those in the MS and PhD programs, come to SPH because they want to pursue a career as researchers, so there will be all sorts of opportunities for them to work with new faculty and immerse themselves in research for their dissertation or other projects. And even though many of our students, particularly those in the MPH and DrPH programs, don’t necessarily intend to pursue research careers, they still want to be in a rich and innovative research environment and learn about research on important topics, even if it’s just in the classroom. So I think this effort supports our education mission and environment more broadly for all of our students.

    To learn more about joining the faculty at SPH, or to submit an application, click here. To learn more about the school’s research, education, and practice related to the strategic research directions and more, please visit our website.

    ** 

    About Boston University School of Public Health
    Founded in 1976, Boston University School of Public Health is one of the top five ranked private schools of public health in the world. It offers master's- and doctoral-level education in public health. The faculty in six departments conduct policy-changing public health research around the world, with the mission of improving the health of populations—especially the disadvantaged, underserved, and vulnerable—locally and globally.

    For Media inquiries, contact Michael Saunders, Writing Director.

  • Knowledge is power, and in the field of public health, knowing how to create a healthier, more just world for all is often not enough. For sustainable, effective changes to be made, this knowledge must be turned into action.

    Enter the Activist Lab at the School of Public Health, a catalyst for bold public health practice created to equip individuals with the knowledge, skills, and experience necessary to fight inequities and create conditions for a world in which all people can reach their full potential.

    “At SPH, our practice, education, and research have advocacy and activism ingrained in them,” says Craig Andrade (SPH’06,’11), associate dean for practice and director of the Activist Lab. “The Activist Lab really works to complement and uplift this work and bring forward opportunities to engage in public health practice through an advocacy and social justice lens.”

    Taking the reins from Harold Cox, associate professor of community health sciences and founder of the Activist Lab, Andrade stepped into his role as the new director at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and just one week after the murder of George Floyd. The magnitude of the moment presented many challenges and opportunities, but Andrade chose to focus on the opportunities and move forward with a reimagined vision for the Activist Lab: to believe in a world in which no injustice goes unchallenged.

    “The first iteration of the Activist Lab laid the groundwork to make sure that we can see and understand what is happening in the world locally, nationally, and globally right now,” says Andrade. “The world is uniquely ready for this moment; many eyes are more open, clear, and focused on injustice. We’ve been doing this work for a while, but we know more now than we have before, so it really is the perfect time to walk with our community members, tap into what is important to them, and learn from their many diverse experiences in the world.”

    The Activist Lab team sees the diverse backgrounds and lived experiences that each member of the SPH community brings to the table as an asset, and they hope to uplift and honor these differences in a way that creates authentic partners, enriches both the school and the future public health workforce, and pushes public health forward.

    “There is no one recipe for how to do public health practice,” says Emily Barbo, assistant director of the Activist Lab. “We really want to lean into people’s experiences and help our community—especially our students—discover what public health practice means for them and help them navigate how to step into their practice bravely and authentically.”

    In November 2020, the team convened virtual talking circles with students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community partners to gather feedback on how, given the current moment, the Activist Lab could best support them in their public health practice.

    From students voicing their eagerness to be seen and have their voices heard and faculty being excited about training the next generation of public health practitioners to alumni showing their investment in the future success of the school and their colleagues, these conversations made clear that the SPH community is ready to get involved and get to work.

    The feedback the Activist Lab team received was unlike any they had heard before, and Barbo believes this was because they started asking the right questions, informed by what they learned in previous years. “Our calling people in allows them to really see themselves in our work. When we first started the Activist Lab, there was a specific vision of what an activist looked like—which was a bit othering for some folks. We are working hard to shift this perspective and become more inclusive in our work to show that though activism may look different for everyone, anyone can be an activist.”

    The Activist Lab team hopes to motivate and engage the SPH community in their practice work this fall through their programming. They are currently working on an activist meet-and-greet series, which will bring new voices and advocacy organizations to campus to share their experiences with advocacy work across communities and build connections with the school community.

    They will also continue to offer Activist Fellowships and Impact Grants (previously known as Activist Bucks) for students, as well as bring in activists in residence to campus to continue to build partnerships and enrich opportunities for the SPH community to learn and grow in their advocacy work.

    “Public health work is often very heavy,” says Caroline McQuade, operations associate in the Activist Lab and an incoming MPH student, “and I hope that our programming allows people to engage with this heavy work in a way that is meaningful to them, but also in a way that brings joy and excitement back into their work.”

    Over the next year, the Activist Lab team also plans to continue to expand their network of collaborators, public health practitioners, and activists beyond just South Boston.

    “With the COVID-19 pandemic, we have become more accustomed to Zoom and other technologies that have allowed us to connect in ways we never really did before,” says Barbo. “We want to see this as an opportunity to continue to do the work in our backyard, but also expand our portfolio of practice opportunities throughout the Commonwealth, the country, and even the world.”

    In all that they do, the Activist Lab team hopes to help people tap into what bold public health practice looks like for them and prepare students to step into the workforce with a transformed perspective on public health.

    “Whether it is building just communitiesbeing agents of change, or taking a stand against injustice, being bold in your practice means breaking the mold and misbehaving in ways that push boundaries,” says Andrade.

    “The Activist Lab is part of every element of our school community and mission as an organization,” says Barbo, “and we really hope that every member of our community sees themselves in our work and comes to us to learn, engage, and get in good trouble.”

    ** 

    About Boston University School of Public Health
    Founded in 1976, Boston University School of Public Health is one of the top five ranked private schools of public health in the world. It offers master's- and doctoral-level education in public health. The faculty in six departments conduct policy-changing public health research around the world, with the mission of improving the health of populations—especially the disadvantaged, underserved, and vulnerable—locally and globally.

    For Media inquiries, contact Michael Saunders, Writing Director.

  • The Graduate Student Life Office at the School of Public Health is launching a student mentoring program to assist first-generation graduate students at SPH in navigating the complex, often unspoken systems of higher education.

    Recognizing significant gaps in campus-wide accommodations for first-generation graduate students—defined as those students who are in the first generation of their families to pursue an advanced degree—Ryann Monteiro (SPH’18), program manager in the Graduate Student Life Office, says she has been informally providing resources and support to these students over the last few years. As a first-generation graduate student herself, Monteiro understands these students’ needs and hopes that the more formal nature of the mentoring program will create a strong sense of community and connection among students, their peers, and SPH faculty and staff.

    “Often, getting into school is the easiest part of the higher education process,” says Monteiro. “This program is designed to help students figure out what happens after getting accepted, the ‘what’ and the ‘how,’ as well as the non-academic factors that may affect their graduate school experience.”

    Set to launch this fall, the pilot program is open to incoming, first-generation students at SPH, and mentor positions are open to faculty and staff who have also gone through graduate or professional programs as a first-generation student. Each mentor will be paired with three or four students in a “pod” based on the students’ needs and preferences across a range of demographic criteria, as well as degree and certificate programs and other areas of interest. Pods are expected to meet in-person or virtually once a month for group check ins, and one-on-one sessions between mentors and mentees will take place as needed.

    Before meeting with their pods, mentors will also participate in a required training on the resources available to first-generation students across both SPH and BU, as well as on different mentoring styles and anticipated themes that may come up in conversations with their mentees and how to navigate them.

    “It is our job as faculty and staff to provide our students with resources that will allow them to get the most out of their experience in their program,” says Monteiro. “We want to make sure that incoming first-generation students feel seen, supported, and valued on campus. This shouldn’t be framed as a deficient experience, but rather as a program to meet students and their needs wherever they are at.”

    In addition to building community on campus, Monteiro hopes that this program allows students to define what success means to them.

    “Often, we impose what we think success is on others, and it usually comes from a point of privilege,” she says. “The goal is to have faculty and staff create opportunities for their mentees that allow them to succeed in a way that is meaningful to them, whether it be research, advocacy work, or something else entirely. This will look different for each student, and that is okay.”

    Monteiro also hopes that the knowledge and skills that students gain throughout their time in the program are able to extend beyond their time at SPH. From learning to set boundaries and developing a stronger sense of financial literacy to navigating difficult conversations in their personal and professional lives, she says these lifelong tools are essential for navigating the world long after they graduate from their program.

    For faculty and staff, Monteiro hopes that—regardless of whether in a teaching or administrative role—they are able to become more informed and understanding of the lived experiences of students on campus.

    “The mentor-mentee relationships that come out of this program are reciprocal, rather than transactional,” she says. “We all have a part to play in making our first-generation students feel valued on our campus, and we hope that everyone involved in the mentoring program walks away with more support and compassion for others.”

    ** 

    About Boston University School of Public Health
    Founded in 1976, Boston University School of Public Health is one of the top five ranked private schools of public health in the world. It offers master's- and doctoral-level education in public health. The faculty in six departments conduct policy-changing public health research around the world, with the mission of improving the health of populations—especially the disadvantaged, underserved, and vulnerable—locally and globally.

    For Media inquiries, contact Michael Saunders, Writing Director.

  • Adrian Raygoza’s public health journey began in 2007, when he enlisted in the US Army during the height of the Afghanistan War. The Executive MPH student’s desire to serve led to several travels and deployments overseas as a sergeant in the Middle East, Central America, and Northeast Asia for more than 10 years. 

    “Serving in Afghanistan was my first real job and first time leaving the country,” says Raygoza, a Chicago-area native. While overseas, “I wasn’t just working—I was able to interact with people all around the world, learn about other cultures, and gain exposure to population health issues in different countries,” he says.

    When he returned home, Raygoza decided to go back to school, first earning an associate’s degree in criminal justice at College of DuPage, before discovering a passion for science and earning a Bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). While completing his degree, he worked as a research aide in the Division of Infectious Diseases at UIC’s Department of Medicine, as well as a research project coordinator at UIC’s School of Public Health, and a peer recovery coach providing support to military veterans.

    Juggling multiple roles and clinical research projects has paid off. Raygoza still works in infectious diseases at UIC, except now, he is at the helm of the university’s COVID-19 response, managing several initiatives at the school level and city-wide in collaboration with the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH). The multifaceted global health crisis is in part what motivated Raygoza to pursue his MPH degree, so he attends classes at night in SPH’s online EMPH program

    “All of the skills that I have gained in each facet of my life are helping me now in my career,” says Raygoza. “I gained population health skills in the army, investigational skills studying criminal justice, scientific skills through my biology degree, and now I hope to move to the next level of my career with an MPH degree.”

    At UIC, Raygoza is a clinical research coordinator for a Moderna mRNA vaccine trial, where he leads a research team and performs a host of other tasks, including interviewing study participants, analyzing data, and performing COVID tests. “Right now, we’re in the unblinding phase, where we bring back participants to let them know whether they’ve been receiving the actual vaccine or the placebo,” he says.

    Raygoza is also a project manager for the Department of Medicine’s COVID-19 Rapid Response Team, in collaboration with CDPH and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He manages COVID-19 testing programs at multiple testing sites such as homeless shelters and nursing homes, coordinates the delivery of PPE and medical equipment, and also performs COVID tests.

    In connection with Boston EMPH’s practicum requirement, Raygoza applied and became an operations manager at UI Health’s (University of Illinois Hospital System) Contact Tracing Center to support the city’s broader efforts to track community spread of the virus. The position began as an internship, but he has become a core part of the team, conducting budget analyses and equipment procurement, and managing the tracing program. The contact tracing program investigates positive cases from the UI Hospital and traces the contacts of those patients, as well as assists to provide resources and refer social services to those affected by the COVID-19.

    “Contact tracing has become more challenging in the past few months, as some people become complacent with the pandemic,” says Raygoza. “It’s not easy, but we’re doing a good job working interdepartmentally and communicating with multiple institutions, and part of my job is to handle all of those moving parts.”

    Raygoza hopes to build upon these leadership skills in the Executive MPH program, which has been an ideal fit for both his professional goals and non-stop schedule.

    “Employers who need people to lead an entire public health operation or intervention are looking for people who are skilled in more than science,” he says. “We’re not only about learning about quantitative methods, we’re also learning about healthcare management and how to communicate better, and evaluate health systems, which is crucial when presenting to executive boards, or boards of public health.”

    Luckily, time management is one of the many skills Raygoza mastered during his service in the army. 

    “In the military, we had to get up early every morning, with continuous movement throughout the day,” says Raygoza. “I try to use all the time I have in the day to accomplish everything I need to get done—but it’s also important to know when to stop and restart in the morning. That’s the strategy I used every day in my professional life.”

    ** 

    About Boston University School of Public Health
    Founded in 1976, Boston University School of Public Health is one of the top five ranked private schools of public health in the world. It offers master's- and doctoral-level education in public health. The faculty in six departments conduct policy-changing public health research around the world, with the mission of improving the health of populations—especially the disadvantaged, underserved, and vulnerable—locally and globally.

    For Media inquiries, contact Michael Saunders, Writing Director.


 Msg #4368: Products

  • Master's Degree Programs
    Named #8 in U.S. News & World Report rankings, our approach to public health education combines foundational learning and a practical training with top-tier programs....

  • Master of Public Health (MPH)

    The MPH program at BUSPH prepares students to influence change and transform lives. Our in-the-world approach translates into a revolutionary model of public health education that gives you the opportunity to investigate pressing challenges and develop productive solutions.

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    Online Executive Master of Public Health

    Catering to the needs of seasoned public health professionals, the Executive MPH program is in a class of its own. Its innovative, fully online structure has revolutionized the MPH field of study, providing an educational opportunity for students to complete the graduate degree without disrupting their successful career progress.

    • Cohort-based learning for growth of professional networks
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    Master's Degrees

    A strong interest in research could lead you to one of our research-focused master’s programs. Study biostatistics, climate & health, epidemiology, global health, public health data science, or translation and implementation science.

    Learn more.

  • Public Health Conversations
    Learn more about our events....

  • Public Health Conversations bring speakers to our campus to engage in thoughtful conversations about the pressing issues of public health.

    View our upcoming Fall 2021 events.

  • Population Health Exchange
    Population Health Exchange (PHX) is a one-stop shop for lifelong learning, offering flexible courses that meet your need for career building opportunities that fit into your schedule....

  • The world’s health needs are changing, and the aspirations of public health are evolving apace. PHX embodies Boston University School of Public Health’s commitment to offering comprehensive population health education to the world and serves as a resource for anyone looking to update their skills or deepen their understanding of the pressing public health issues of our time. We invite you to spend time on our site exploring topics, courses, and articles that further your lifelong learning goals.

    Visit our website.

  • Free, Online Mini-MPH
    Six hours of engaging, online content that covers key concepts of public health, with expert faculty, accessible to everyone....

  • Because of the commitment to ensure access to education around pressing public health issues, BUSPH, in partnership with Population Health Exchange, now offers a free, online Mini-MPH. The Mini-MPH provides foundational knowledge in public health to all interested learners. The program includes six hours of engaging, online content that covers key concepts of public health, with expert faculty, accessible to everyone.

    Each component of the Mini-MPH is free, online, and asynchronous:

    • What is Public Health?—Learn about the foundations of public health with BUSPH Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Sandro Galea.
    • Quantitative Methods for Public Health—Learn to evaluate and interpret data to make evidence-based decisions to improve health with BUSPH Associate Dean of Education and Professor of Biostatistics, Lisa Sullivan.
    • Leadership and Management for Public Health—Learn to communicate with, engage, and organize diverse groups in pursuit of change efforts to improve population health with BUSPH Associate Dean of Public Health Practice, Harold Cox.
    • Health Systems, Law and Policy—Examine the constitutional, regulatory, political, and socio-economic bases for policies that determine access, quality, cost and equity in health services and population health programs with BUSPH Professor of Health Law, Policy and Management, David Rosenbloom.
    • Individual, Community and Population Health—Understand how program design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation improve the health of individuals, communities, and populations with BUSPH Clinical Assistant Professor of Community Health Sciences, Sophie Godley.
       

    Register Now

  • Public Health Post
    Public Health Post informs and inflects the broader conversation on health and social justice....

  • Every day we feature new articles about the state of the health of the population. We invite policymakers, journalists, academics, and practitioners to share their work in ways that can influence health on a local, national, and global scale. Our editors, working with graduate student Public Health Post Fellows, present health statistics, research summaries, interviews with important health thinkers, and easy-to-understand data graphics to start new conversations about health. We join and drive the national dialogue on public health.

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  • Doctoral Degree Programs
    Take a leadership role in the advancement of public health....

  • When you join one of our doctoral programs, you will play a leading role in pioneering studies that illuminate and solve problems affecting the health of individuals and communities. And you’ll graduate with the comprehensive knowledge and the rigorous methodological skills to translate research into policy and practice—characteristics that set our alumni apart as leaders in their disciplines.

    SPH offers four PhD programs and one DrPH program:

  • Public Health Writing Program
    With the appropriate support and resources, anyone who approaches their writing as a skill they practice daily can improve....

  • Writing clear, powerful prose is an intellectual and emotional process that involves time, humility, courage, patience, optimism, and constant practice. Similar to excelling at a sport or playing beautiful music, becoming a better writer demands daily intentional engagement and constant attention to possibilities for improving process, style, and precision. With the appropriate support and resources, anyone who approaches their writing as a skill they practice daily can improve.

    Learn more about the BUSPH Public Health Writing Program.

  • Activist Lab
    Catalyst for bold public health practice....

  • As public health professionals, our task is to use our knowledge, skills, and passion to ensure that all people, especially those who are marginalized, are able to live healthy, fulfilled lives. The Activist Lab is a catalyst for bold public health practice that disrupts injustice with tenacity and compassion.

    The Activist Lab is part of an ecosystem of thinking, teaching, and doing. So public health practice is embedded in every aspect of our school’s mission.

    We believe the practice of public health is to build a just community starting on our campus moving with all of our partnerships and engagements worldwide.

    The Activist Lab’s relationships and activities offer our students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community partners the opportunity to develop tools they can use to be effective change agents. And we stand with and join local, regional, and national advocates as they confront injustice in the world.

  • Careers at BUSPH
    Explore open faculty, staff, and postdoctoral research positions....

  • If you want to be at the cutting edge of research and innovation, in the heart of the city, consider joining Boston University.

    While there are many reasons to consider a job, at Boston University we believe there’s more to it than simply being employed. As a leading global research institution, BU has a rich legacy of serving its students, faculty, and staff as well as the communities beyond campus. You can become a part of this legacy, have a direct impact on students, and take advantage of competitive benefits and opportunities for professional and personal growth.

    Explore open positions at BUSPH and on the BU Medical Campus.

  • APHA Virtual Info Sessions
    Learn more about our degree programs or connect with our program directors....

  • To learn more about our degree programs or connect with our program directors during APHA, please use Zoom links below:

    Sunday, October 25: 12pm–1pm, Mountain Time

    PhD in Health Services Research Information Session with Steve Pizer, PhD
    Zoom Link: https://bostonu.zoom.us/j/97306635760?pwd=YzNTMlZyaXgwc0JJYUpGYU55bnZ4Zz09

    Sunday, October 25: 2pm–4pm, Mountain Time

    PhD in Epidemiology Information Session with Sherri Stuver, ScD
    Zoom Link: https://bostonu.zoom.us/j/98605817820?pwd=b1ZMVjlwTUhiTWNnbmdYV2s3NTNnQT09

    Monday, October 26: 12pm–1pm, Mountain Time

    PhD in Environmental Health Information Session with Birgit Claus Henn, ScD
    Zoom Link: https://bostonu.zoom.us/j/96322226217?pwd=eFNkT0U1L0RmcXpRWUJXSWw3RUE4QT09

    Monday, October 26: 1pm–2pm, Mountain Time

    DrPH Information Session with Trish Elliott, DrPH
    Zoom Link: https://bostonu.zoom.us/j/97330551524?pwd=QUhNQ0VXMVNUVnY2T2MrMnhEek1ldz09


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