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Centers for Disease Control & Prevention  

Atlanta,  GA 
United States
http://www.cdc.gov
  • Msg #4359: Booth: 214


Welcome Attendees!

CDC works 24/7 to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same.

CDC increases the health security of our nation. As the nation’s health protection agency, CDC saves lives and protects people from health threats. To accomplish our mission, CDC conducts critical science and provides health information that protects our nation against expensive and dangerous health threats, and responds when these arise.

 Learn more about COVID-19 trends: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#cases_casesper100klast7days

Imagery of a vaccine vial, a calendar, and an alarm clock.

Get Vaccinated!

Get vaccinated before flu season starts
Doctor hands putting white adhesive bandage on young woman shoulder

It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies that protect against flu to develop in the body.

See Press Release, Who Needs a Flu Vaccine and When.

PLEASE JOIN US FOR OUR VIRTUAL

MEET & GREET SESSIONS

LISTED UNDER SHOW SPECIALS BELOW


 Msg #4365: Videos

I Am CDC J. Austin

 Msg #4366: Show Specials


 Msg #4367: Press Releases

  • Delta Variant: What We Know About the Science

    Updated Aug. 26, 2021

    On July 27, 2021, CDC released updated guidance on the need for urgently increasing COVID-19 vaccination coverage and a recommendation for everyone in areas of substantial or high transmission to wear a mask in public indoor places, even if they are fully vaccinated. CDC issued this new guidance due to several concerning developments and newly emerging data signals.

    First, a significant increase in new cases reversed what had been a steady decline since January 2021. In the days leading up to our guidance update, CDC saw a rapid and alarming rise in the COVID-19 case and hospitalization rates around the country.

    • In late June, the 7-day moving average of reported cases was around 12,000. On July 27, the 7-day moving average of cases reached over 60,000. This case rate looked more like the rate of cases we had seen before the vaccine was widely available.

    Second, new data began to emerge that the Delta variant was more infectious and was leading to increased transmissibility when compared with other variants, even in some vaccinated individuals. This includes recently published data from CDC and our public health partners, unpublished surveillance data that will be publicly available in the coming weeks, information included in CDC’s updated Science Brief on COVID-19 Vaccines and Vaccination, and ongoing outbreak investigations linked to the Delta variant.

    Delta is currently the predominant variant of the virus in the United States. Below is a high-level summary of what CDC scientists have recently learned about the Delta variant. More information will be made available when more data are published or released in other formats.

    Infections and Spread

    The Delta variant causes more infections and spreads faster than early forms of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

    • The Delta variant is more contagious: The Delta variant is highly contagious, more than 2x as contagious as previous variants.
    • Some data suggest the Delta variant might cause more severe illness than previous variants in unvaccinated people. In two different studies from Canada and Scotland, patients infected with the Delta variant were more likely to be hospitalized than patients infected with Alpha or the original virus that causes COVID-19. Even so, the vast majority of hospitalization and death caused by COVID-19 are in unvaccinated people.
    • Unvaccinated people remain the greatest concern: The greatest risk of transmission is among unvaccinated people who are much more likely to get infected, and therefore transmit the virus. Fully vaccinated people get COVID-19 (known as breakthrough infections) less often than unvaccinated people. People infected with the Delta variant, including fully vaccinated people with symptomatic breakthrough infections, can transmit the virus to others. CDC is continuing to assess data on whether fully vaccinated people with asymptomatic breakthrough infections can transmit the virus.
    • Fully vaccinated people with Delta variant breakthrough infections can spread the virus to others. However, vaccinated people appear to spread the virus for a shorter time: For prior variants, lower amounts of viral genetic material were found in samples taken from fully vaccinated people who had breakthrough infections than from unvaccinated people with COVID-19. For people infected with the Delta variant, similar amounts of viral genetic material have been found among both unvaccinated and fully vaccinated people. However, like prior variants, the amount of viral genetic material may go down faster in fully vaccinated people when compared to unvaccinated people. This means fully vaccinated people will likely spread the virus for less time than unvaccinated people.

    Vaccines

    Vaccines in the US are highly effective, including against the Delta variant

    • The COVID-19 vaccines approved or authorized in the United States are highly effective at preventing severe disease and death, including against the Delta variant. But they are not 100% effective, and some fully vaccinated people will become infected (called a breakthrough infection) and experience illness. For all people, the vaccine provides the best protection against serious illness and death.
    • Vaccines are playing a crucial role in limiting spread of the virus and minimizing severe disease. Although vaccines are highly effective, they are not perfect, and there will be vaccine breakthrough infections. Millions of Americans are vaccinated, and that number is growing. This means that even though the risk of breakthrough infections is low, there will be thousands of fully vaccinated people who become infected and able to infect others, especially with the surging spread of the Delta variant. Low vaccination coverage in many communities is driving the current rapid surge in cases involving the Delta variant, which also increases the chances that even more concerning variants could emerge.
    • Vaccination is the best way to protect yourself, your family, and your community. High vaccination coverage will reduce spread of the virus and help prevent new variants from emerging. CDC recommends that everyone aged 12 years and older get vaccinated as soon as possible.

    Masks

    Given what we know about the Delta variant, vaccine effectiveness, and current vaccine coverage, layered prevention strategies, including wearing masks, are needed to reduce the transmission of this variant

    • At this time, as we build the level of vaccination nationwide, we must also use all the prevention strategies available, including masking indoors in public places, to stop transmission and stop the pandemic. Everyone who is able, including fully vaccinated people, should wear masks in public indoor places in areas of substantial or high transmission.
  • COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot

    Updated Sept. 1, 2021

    HHS announced a plan to begin offering COVID-19 vaccine booster shots this fall. CDC’s independent advisory committee, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, will continue to meet and discuss data on the evolution of the pandemic and the use of COVID-19 vaccines. ACIP will make further recommendations on the use of boosters for the public after a thorough review of the evidence.

    When can I get a COVID-19 vaccine booster?

    Not immediately. The goal is for people to start receiving a COVID-19 booster shot beginning in the fall, with individuals being eligible starting 8 months after they received their second dose of an mRNA vaccine (either Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna). This is subject to authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and recommendation by CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). FDA is conducting an independent evaluation to determine the safety and effectiveness of a booster dose of the mRNA vaccines. ACIP will decide whether to issue a booster dose recommendation based on a thorough review of the evidence.

    Who will be the first people to get a booster dose?

    If the FDA authorizes and ACIP recommends a booster dose, people who were first to receive a COVID-19 vaccination when they became available in early 2021 (e.g., those who are most at risk) are likely to be the first people eligible for a booster. This includes healthcare providers, residents of long-term care facilities, and other older adults.

    Why is the United States waiting to start offering COVID-19 vaccine boosters?

    The COVID-19 vaccines authorized in the United States continue to be highly effective in reducing risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death, even against the widely circulating Delta variant. However, COVID-19 constantly evolves. Experts are looking at all available data to understand how well the vaccines are working, including how new variants, like Delta, affect vaccine effectiveness. If FDA authorizes and ACIP recommends it, the goal is for people to start receiving a COVID-19 booster shot this fall.

    Can people who received Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen (J&J/Janssen) COVID-19 Vaccine get a booster dose of an mRNA vaccine?

    No, there aren’t enough data currently to support getting an mRNA vaccine dose (either Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) if someone has previously gotten a J&J/Janssen vaccine. People who got the J&J/Janssen vaccine will likely need a booster dose of the J&J/Janssen vaccine, and more data are expected in the coming weeks. With those data in hand, CDC will keep the public informed with a timely plan for J&J/Janssen booster shots.

    Will people who received Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen (J&J/Janssen) COVID-19 Vaccine need a booster shot?

    It is likely that people who received a J&J COVID-19 vaccine will need a booster dose. Because the J&J/Janssen vaccine wasn’t given in the United States until 70 days after the first mRNA vaccine doses (Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna), the data needed to make this decision aren’t available yet. These data are expected in the coming weeks. With those data in hand, CDC will keep the public informed with a timely plan for J&J/Janssen booster shots.

    If we need a booster dose, does that mean that the vaccines aren’t working?

    No. COVID-19 vaccines are working very well to prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death, even against the widely circulating Delta variant. However, with the Delta variant, public health experts are starting to see reduced protection against mild and moderate disease. For that reason, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is planning for a booster shot so vaccinated people maintain protection over the coming months.

    What’s the difference between a booster dose and an additional dose?

    Sometimes people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised do not build enough (or any) protection when they first get a vaccination. When this happens, getting another dose of the vaccine can sometimes help them build more protection against the disease. This appears to be the case for some immunocompromised people and COVID-19 vaccines. CDC recommends moderately to severely immunocompromised people consider receiving an additional (third) dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) at least 28 days after the completion of the initial 2-dose mRNA COVID-19 vaccine series.

    In contrast, a “booster dose” refers to another dose of a vaccine that is given to someone who built enough protection after vaccination, but then that protection decreased over time (this is called waning immunity). HHS has developed a plan to begin offering COVID-19 booster shots to people this fall. Implementation of the plan is subject to FDA’s authorization and ACIP’s recommendation.

  • Who should get a flu vaccine this season?

    Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every season with rare exceptions. Vaccination is particularly important for people who are at higher risk of serious complications from influenza. A full listing of people at Higher Risk of Developing Flu-Related Complications is available.

    Flu vaccination has important benefits. It can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations and deaths.

    Different flu vaccines are approved for use in different groups of people.

    There are many vaccine options to choose from.  CDC does not recommend any one flu vaccine over another. The most important thing is for all people 6 months and older to get a flu vaccine every year.

    If you have questions about which flu vaccine to get, talk to your doctor or other health care professional. More information is available at Who Should Get Vaccinated.

    Who Should Not Receive a Flu Shot:

    Most people should be vaccinated for influenza each year, But some people should not be vaccinated, or should not receive some types of influenza vaccines, depending upon things such as their age, health (current and past) and whether they have certain allergies.

    Information about who cannot get a flu vaccine and who should talk to their doctor before getting a flu vaccine is available at Who Should & Who Should NOT Get Vaccinated.

    Special Consideration Regarding Egg Allergy

    People with egg allergies can receive any licensed, recommended age-appropriate influenza vaccine (IIV4, RIV4, or LAIV4) that is otherwise appropriate. People who have a history of severe egg allergy (those who have had any symptom other than hives after exposure to egg) should be vaccinated in a medical setting, supervised by a health care provider who is able to recognize and manage severe allergic reactions. Two completely egg-free (ovalbumin-free) flu vaccine options are available: quadrivalent recombinant vaccine and quadrivalent cell-based vaccine.

    Get vaccinated before flu season starts
    Doctor hands putting white adhesive bandage on young woman shoulder

    It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies that protect against flu to develop in the body.

    September and October are generally good times to be vaccinated against flu. Ideally, everyone should be vaccinated by the end of October. Additional considerations concerning the timing of vaccination for certain groups include:

    • Adults, especially those 65 years and older, should generally not get vaccinated early (in July or August) because protection may decrease over time, but early vaccination can be considered for any person who is unable to return at a later time to be vaccinated.
    • Children can get vaccinated as soon as vaccine becomes available, even if this is in July or August. Some children need two doses of flu vaccine. For those children it is recommended to get the first dose as soon as vaccine is available, because the second dose needs to given at least 4 weeks after the first.
    • Early vaccination can also be considered for people who are in the third trimester of pregnancy, because this can help protect their infants during the first months of life (when they are too young to be vaccinated).
  • Hearing protection is for everyone. There is no cure for hearing loss! The good news? You can prevent hearing loss by protecting your hearing.

    Avoid loud noise whenever possible and turn down the volume on personal listening devices. If you can’t avoid loud noise, use earplugs or earmuffs to protect your ears.

    If you suspect you may already have hearing loss, take steps to keep it from getting worse. Get your hearing checked.

    CDC supports National Protect Your Hearing Month (#NPYHM). It is an annual event each October to provide an opportunity to raise awareness about hearing and speech problems, encouraging people to think about their own hearing, and to get their hearing checked if they think there might be a problem.

    Early identification and intervention for hearing loss is important. Many people live with unidentified hearing loss, often failing to realize that they are missing certain sounds and words. Checking one’s hearing would be the first step towards addressing the issue.

    Do you use your music, your show, or a podcast to shut out the noise around you? Be cautious; hearing loss is real. A volume that lets you hear someone a few feet away is a safer way to go.

    Did You Know?

    Repeated exposure to loud noise over the years can damage your hearing—long after exposure has stopped.

    This is just one of the many informative facts available on CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health’s new hearing loss website.

    Think you are aware of how to protect yourself? When it comes to hearing loss, we can all think of the usual suspects: attending sporting events, entertainment venues, and loud concerts. Volume isn’t the only factor to consider. Noise exposure is cumulative. Practice safe listening at home, school, and while commuting by reducing the duration of headphone use.

    Everyday activities such as using power tools, mowing the lawn, or attending a fitness or gym class with loud music can damage hearing.

    Peruse CDC’s website on noise-induced hearing loss to learn more detailed information on the following topics: “What Noises Cause Hearing Loss?” “How Does Loud Noise Cause Hearing Loss?” “How Do I Know if I Have Hearing Loss Caused by Loud Noise?” “How Do I Prevent Hearing Loss from Loud Noise?” and “What If I Already Have Hearing Loss?”

    Browse these pages to discover critical information you are likely unaware of.

    Useful Info

    Is the noise too loud? If you need to shout to make yourself heard, yes.

    • Ways to protect your hearing include turning the volume down, taking periodic breaks from the noise, and using hearing protection, such as earplugs and hearing protection earmuffs.
    • Signs that you may have hearing loss include difficulty hearing high-pitched sounds (e.g., doorbell, telephone, alarm clock) and difficulty understanding conversations in a noisy place.

    By the Numbers

    Sound is measured in decibels (dB). A whisper is about 30 dB, normal conversation is about 60 dB, and a motorcycle engine is about 95 dB. Noise above 70 dB over a prolonged period may start to damage your hearing. Loud noise above 120 dB can cause immediate harm.

    Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition in the United States. Almost twice as many people report hearing loss as report diabetes or cancer. In the United States, about 40 million adults aged 20–69 years have noise-induced hearing loss, and about 1 in 4 adults who report “excellent to good” hearing already have hearing damage.

    Think that hearing damage is usually workplace-related? Activities away from work can damage hearing just as much as a noisy job. Over half of all adults with hearing damage do not have noisy jobs.

    The average person is born with about 16,000 hair cells within their inner ear. These cells allow your brain to detect sounds. Damaged inner ear cells do not grow back. So, protect your hearing, and if you already have hearing loss, or are experiencing pain, discomfort, or ringing in the ears, take steps to keep it from getting worse.

    Teen hearing protection PSA

    No matter what kind of headphones you use, keeping the volume at a safe level is most important for hearing protection.

    Teen hearing protection PSA

    If you think it’s too loud, it probably is! You may not be worried about hearing loss, but teenagers are vulnerable to noise-induced hearing loss. The best way to prevent it? Turn it down, move away or use hearing protection.

    Teen hearing protection PSA

    Have you ever left a concert and heard a ringing in your ears? This is a sign that you’ve overworked your ears, leaving them prone to hearing damage that can’t be reversed. You can prevent this by wearing hearing protection the next time you’re at a concert.

  • Pathways Programs for Students and Recent Graduates

    If you are a student or a recent college graduate, and are looking for rewarding work experience to supplement your education, then the Pathways Program is just for you! The Pathways program is made up of three main components: the Internship Program which offers internship and summer employment opportunities to students; the Recent Graduates Program where recent college graduates can obtain enriching developmental work experience in public health and related support occupations; and the Presidential Management Fellows Program that offers leadership development opportunities to students who are in the process of completing their master’s, law, or doctoral-level degree within the academic year.  See the information below for more details.

    Internship Program

    The Internship Program is for high school and college students in search of an internship or other opportunity to gain work experience while in school. The program is designed to provide students who are enrolled in a wide variety of educational institutions, from high school to graduate level, with paid opportunities to work in agencies and explore Federal careers while still in school. Students who successfully complete the program may be eligible for conversion to a permanent job in the civil service. Explore available internship opportunitiesexternal icon at CDC!

    Student Summer Employment – Pathways Interns

    The Student Summer Employment provides training and work experience for individuals during summer months. The work ranges from office support trades to positions in professional fields.

    Eligibility

    Students must meet the following eligibility requirements to participate in the Student Summer Employment:

    • Enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a diploma, certificate, or degree-seeking student. Verification showing enrollment status is required from the school.
    • Meet the minimum age required by federal, state, or local laws and standards governing the employment of minors.
    • Taking or scheduled to take a course load at least half-time in an accredited high school, technical or vocational school, 2-year or 4-year college or university, graduate or professional school.

    Pay and Benefits

    Students in the Pathways receive a competitive salary, but are not eligible for federal benefits.

    How to Apply

    Student summer employment opportunities are announced January through March of each year. Visit USAJobsexternal icon beginning in January for more information on applying for summer employment with CDC.  Detailed instructions on how to apply for student summer employment opportunities are provided during the announcement period.

    Required Documentation

    Resume or Application (OF-612, Optional Application for Federal Employment)external icon

    Academic Transcript

    School Verification Formpdf icon

    Recent Graduate Program

    Have you recently graduated from a qualifying educational institution or program? If yes, then explore the many opportunities available under the new Pathways Recent Graduates Program (RGP). The recent graduates program offers developmental experiences in the Federal Government in an effort to promote possible careers in civil service. To be eligible, applicants must apply within two years of degree or certificate completion except for veterans precluded from doing so due to their military service obligation. Veterans have up to six years after degree completion to apply. Additional information about the Recent Graduates Program can be found at https://www.usajobs.gov/studentsandgrads.external icon


 Msg #4368: Products

  • David J. Sencer Museum
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    Originally called the Global Health Odyssey Museum, the facility was established in 1996 in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 50th anniversary and to coincide with the Centennial Olympic Games. In 2011, the museum was re-named the David J. Sencer CDC Museum, in honor of the longest serving director of CDC.

    Mission

    The CDC Museum’s mission is to educate visitors about the value of prevention–based public health, while collecting, preserving, and presenting CDC’s rich heritage and vast accomplishments through engaging museum exhibitions, dynamic educational programming, and web archives.

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